Strategic Dynamics of Iran’s Continuing Asymmetric Warfare

On January 9, 2020, the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations hosted a public affairs briefing on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., focused on “Strategic Dynamics of Iran’s Continuing Asymmetric Warfare: What Implications for the United States and the Region?”

The National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations January 9, 2020, Public Affairs Briefing examined strategic dynamics related to Iranian asymmetric warfare, and their implications for the region as well as the United States.

The National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations January 9, 2020, Public Affairs Briefing examined strategic dynamics related to Iranian asymmetric warfare, and their implications for the region as well as the United States.

The featured specialists included:

  • Mr. David Des Roches, Senior International Affairs Fellow, National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations; Associate Professor, Near East/South Asia Center for Strategic Studies, National Defense University, U.S. Department of Defense.
  • Dr. Anthony H. Cordesman, Center for Strategic and International Studies Arleigh A. Burke Chair in Strategy; Consultant to the U.S. State Department, Defense Department, and intelligence community; Former Office of the Secretary of Defense Director of Intelligence Assessment.
  • Dr. Thomas Mattair, Middle East Policy Council Executive Director; Author of The Three Occupied UAE Islands: The Tunbs and Abu Musa and Global Security Watch – Iran: A Reference Handbook.
  • Dr. John Duke Anthony, National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations Founding President and CEO; Former U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy Subcommittee on Sanctions Member; only American to have been invited to each of the Gulf Cooperation Council’s Ministerial and Heads of State Summits since the GCC’s inception in 1981.

A podcast recording of the program is available below along with slides from several of the speakers.

 

 

“Strategic Dynamics of Iran’s Continuing Asymmetric Warfare” podcast (.mp3)

Slides from Mr. David Des Roches – “The Iranian Way of (Near) War” (.pdf)

Slides from Dr. Anthony H. Cordesman – “The Gulf and Iran’s Capability for Asymmetric Warfare” (.pdf)

Analysis of U.S. and GCC Tensions with Iran: Implications for Key American Policies

On June 28, 2019, the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations hosted a public affairs briefing on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., focused on “Analysis of U.S. and GCC Tensions with Iran: Implications for Key American Policies.”

The National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations June 28, 2019 Public Affairs Briefing explored implications of ongoing tensions between Iran, the United States, and the Gulf Cooperation Council countries.

The featured specialists included:

  • Mr. Norman Roule, Former National Intelligence Manager for Iran; United Against a Nuclear Iran Senior Advisor.
  • Ms. Kirsten Fontenrose, Former White House National Security Council Senior Director for Gulf Affairs; Sonoran Policy Group Vice President for Global Relations.
  • Mr. Phillip Cornell, Atlantic Council Global Energy Center Nonresident Senior Fellow; Former Saudi Aramco Senior Corporate Planning Advisor; Former International Energy Agency Special Advisor.
  • Mr. David Des Roches, Senior International Affairs Fellow, National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations; Associate Professor, Near East/South Asia Center for Strategic Studies, National Defense University, U.S. Department of Defense.
  • Colonel (Ret.) Abbas K. Dahouk, Former U.S. Department of State Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs Senior Military Advisor; Former Embassy of the U.S. in Saudi Arabia Defense and Army Attaché.
  • Dr. John Duke Anthony, National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations Founding President and CEO; U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy Subcommittee on Sanctions Member; only American to have been invited to each of the Gulf Cooperation Council’s Ministerial and Heads of State Summits since the GCC’s inception in 1981.

A podcast recording of the program is available below.

 

 

“Analysis of U.S. and GCC Tensions with Iran: Implications for Key American Policies” podcast (.mp3)

Furthering U.S.-GCC Trade, Economic Cooperation, and Investment Opportunities

On May 21, 2018, the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations, the Middle East Council of American Chambers of Commerce, and the U.S.-GCC Corporate Cooperation Committee hosted a public affairs briefing exploring how to “Furthering U.S.-GCC Trade, Economic Cooperation, and Investment Opportunities” in Washington, DC.

Mr. Patrick Mancino, Executive Vice President of the National Council, opens the discussion of U.S. economic relations with the Gulf countries at the Council’s May 21, 2018 public affairs briefing.

The featured specialists were:

  • Christopher Johnson, Chairman, Middle East Council of American Chambers of Commerce, and Chairman, American Business Group of Riyadh
  • Fred Shuaibi, Vice Chairman, American Business Council of Kuwait, and Secretary, Middle East Council of American Chambers of Commerce
  • Matthew Kirkham, Board Member, American Business Group of Jeddah, and Finance Chairman, Middle East Council of American Chambers of Commerce
  • Robert Hager, Member, National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations International Advisory Committee, and Partner, Squire Patton Boggs
  • Timir Mukherjee, Board Member, American Business Group of the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia
  • Anne Jaffery, Chairman, American Business Council of Dubai
  • Michael Jones, Washington Representative, Middle East Council of American Chambers of Commerce
  • Nahlah Al-Jubeir, Senior International Affairs Fellow, National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations, and Director of the Center for Career Development, Saudi Arabian Cultural Mission
  • Dr. Karl Petrick, Associate Professor of Economics, Western New England University; Coordinator, Middle East Council of American Chambers of Commerce/Western New England University Gulf Region Trade Project

Dr. John Duke Anthony, Founding President and CEO, National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations, served as context provider and moderator.

A podcast recording of the program is available below.

 

 

“Furthering U.S.-GCC Trade, Economic Cooperation, and Investment Opportunities” podcast (.mp3)

Economic Dynamics of U.S.-GCC Relations

On May 8, 2017, the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations, Nasdaq, and the U.S.-GCC Corporate Cooperation Committee hosted a public affairs briefing on “Economic Dynamics of U.S.-GCC Relations.”

NCUSAR Briefing on

National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations Founding President & CEO Dr. John Duke Anthony speaks at the Council’s May 8, 2017, public affairs briefing on “Economic Dynamics of U.S.-GCC Relations.”

Featured specialists included Dr. John Duke Anthony, Mr. Khaled Alderbesti, Ms. Khlood Aldukheil, and Dr. Ihsan Ali Bu-Hulaiga.

A podcast of the event can be found below as well as in iTunes along with recordings of other National Council programs: http://bit.ly/itunes-ncusar.

“Economic Dynamics of U.S.-GCC Relations” podcast (.mp3)

The Future of U.S.-GCC Trade and Investment

On March 29, 2017, the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations, the Middle East Council of American Chambers of Commerce, Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP, and the U.S.-GCC Corporate Cooperation Committee hosted a public affairs briefing on “The Future of U.S.-GCC Trade and Investment” in Washington, DC.

National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations Founding President & CEO Dr. John Duke Anthony speaks at the Council’s March 29, 2017, public affairs briefing on “The Future of U.S.-GCC Trade and Investment.”

Featured specialists included Dr. John Duke Anthony, Mr. H. Delano Roosevelt, Mr. Christopher Johnson, Ms. Nahlah Al-Jubeir, Mr. Robert Hager, Mr. Mike Jones, and Dr. Karl Petrick.

A podcast of the event can be found below as well as in iTunes along with recordings of other National Council programs: http://bit.ly/itunes-ncusar.

“The Future of U.S.-GCC Trade and Investment” podcast (.mp3)

Opening Keynote Address at the Seventh Annual Gulf Research Meeting

By His Excellency Dr. Abdul Latif Bin Rashid Al Zayani, Secretary General of the Gulf Cooperation Council

Cambridge University, Cambridge, United Kingdom

August 16, 2016

Dr. Abdul Aziz bin Saqer, Ladies and Gentlemen, thank you once again for inviting me to this beautiful city and allowing me to say a few words. My friend Dr. Abdul Aziz, I speak on behalf of all of us gathered here when I say how grateful we are to you and your staff for organizing this annual event to debate matters of such importance and urgency in an atmosphere of academic calm.

H.E. Dr. Abdul Latif bin Rashid Al Zayani with National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations Founding President & CEO Dr. John Duke Anthony at the Seventh Annual Gulf Research Meeting in Cambridge, United Kingdom. Photo: National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations.

H.E. Dr. Abdul Latif bin Rashid Al Zayani with National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations Founding President & CEO Dr. John Duke Anthony at the Seventh Annual Gulf Research Meeting in Cambridge, United Kingdom. Photo: National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations.

This is now the sixth year that I have spoken here and in preparing for today I reflected on the intervening years. Despite some of the most challenging times, there is a consistent strand, namely that we are always striving to make our region a better and more secure place for all our citizens – we are looking at where we want to be.

Here, I think that the GCC vision that sums it up is: “To achieve and maintain prosperity in the widest sense of the word.” In other words, economic wealth for each nation and citizen; opportunities to satisfy personal aspirations; equal opportunities for health, education, employment, and social services, all within a safe and secure environment; and political stability.

This, with one important addition – which is “and to live in harmony despite differences in philosophy and ideology” – is surely the vision for the whole region? The citizens of the region are crying out for an end to violence and a return to normality, peace, and security – so why is this so elusive? Your workshops are wide-ranging, and all in one way or another will impact on this important question. Today, I will look at some of the social, economic, and political factors involved but concentrate mainly on security, with the hope of adding focus to your discussions.

Firstly, there are social issues where there are huge challenges, but probably the greatest social challenge for all of us is our youth – because they are our future. Without appropriate education, employment, and guidance they will be lost souls, easily manipulated, and prone to being turned into a destructive element in society. It is for this reason that the nations of the GCC place youth at the top of the social priority list. But I ask you to give thought on what can be done in a proactive way to consider helping the youth in the region’s trouble spots. They are a seriously endangered species!

Probably the greatest social challenge for all of us is our youth – because they are our future. Without appropriate education, employment, and guidance they will be lost souls, easily manipulated, and prone to being turned into a destructive element in society.

With regard to economy and future prosperity, I am confident that the diversification plans of our member states will stand us in good stead, especially as we recognize the importance of working together. The latest example of such a plan is “Saudi Vision 2030” in which the overall stated vision is “Saudi Arabia: the Heart of the Arab and Islamic World, the Investment Powerhouse, and the Hub connecting Three Continents.” This is a powerful national statement of intent but in many ways it sums up the future for all GCC states. Geographically we are central; historically, culturally, and through religion we are influential; and in terms of investment we have the resources to stimulate growth for ourselves, for the region, and globally.

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The Establishment of a Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) Office in Washington, D.C.

National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations Founding President and CEO Dr. John Duke Anthony recently returned from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. He arrived on the heels of President Obama’s second summit meeting with representatives of the six Gulf Cooperation Council member countries of Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates, together with the GCC Secretary General. Following is a special report on a little-noted development that transpired at the meetings.

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At the invitation of King Salman of Saudi Arabia, leaders of Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries met with U.S. President Barack Obama on Thursday, April 21 in Riyadh for a U.S.-GCC Summit.

One of Obama’s primary goals for the summit was to reassure these U.S. strategic allies and partners that the United States is committed to countering threats to the GCC.

U.S. Statements of Intentions

The president could not have been clearer in stating that, “I reaffirm the policy of the United States to use all elements of our power to secure our core interests in the Gulf region and to deter and confront external aggression against our allies and our partners.”

In the same vein, Obama was tough on Iran in his rhetoric, noting that the United States, even with its nuclear deal with the Islamic Republic, has “serious concerns about Iranian behavior.”

Obama and the GCC leaders also spoke about other issues including ISIS, Yemen, Syria, Iraq, Israel-Palestine, and Lebanon.

President Barack Obama met with Gulf Cooperation Council leaders in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on April 21, 2016. The summit meeting came almost a year after Obama hosted his GCC counterparts in the United States for a summit at Camp David. Photo: The White House.

President Barack Obama met with Gulf Cooperation Council leaders in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on April 21, 2016. The summit meeting came almost a year after Obama hosted his GCC counterparts in the United States for a summit at Camp David. Photo: The White House.

King Salman said the summit was “constructive and fruitful” and thanked Obama for “enhancing the consultation and cooperation between the GCC countries and the U.S.”

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