“Regional Geo-Political Dynamics: The Arabian Peninsula (GCC Countries and Yemen)” at the 2012 Arab-U.S. Policymakers Conference

Dr. Abdulkhaleq Abdulla, Professor of Political Science, United Arab Emirates University (Abu Dhabi) and lead author, 2008 Arab Knowledge Report, at the 2012 Arab-U.S. Policymakers Conference

Dr. John Duke Anthony, Dr. Abdel Aziz Abu Hamad Aluwaisheg, Dr. Abdulkhaleq Abdulla, and Dr. Abdullah K. Al-Shayji  gave remarks on “Policymaking Opportunities and Lessons Learned From Regional Geo-Political Dynamics: The Arabian Peninsula (GCC Countries and Yemen)” at the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations’ 21st Annual Arab-U.S. Policymakers Conference. The conference, on the theme “Arab-U.S. Relations Amidst Transition within Constancy: Implications for American and Arab Interests and Policies,” was held October 25-26, 2012 at the Ronald Reagan Building & International Trade Center in Washington, DC.

Watch session in the C-SPAN Video Library

Listen to a podcast of the session

Read a transcript of remarks as delivered

“A Window onto the Gulf Cooperation Council” – Remarks by His Excellency Abdul Latif Bin Rashid Al Zayani

“A Window onto the Gulf Cooperation Council,
Together With a View Regarding Its
Involvement Of Late With Yemen”

Remarks by

His Excellency Dr. Abdul Latif Bin Rashid Al Zayani,
Secretary General of the Gulf Cooperation Council

to the

Gulf Research Center’s Third Annual Gulf Research Meeting,
University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom

July 11, 2012

Introduction by Dr. John Duke Anthony,
Founding President and CEO of the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations

 

The National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations is privileged to publish the remarks made earlier today by H.E. Dr. Abdul Latif Bin Rashid Al Zayani, Secretary General of the Gulf Cooperation Council, who has granted his permission.   The occasion is the three-day Third Annual Gulf Research Meeting (GRM) presented by the Gulf Research Center (GRC) with offices in Jeddah, Geneva, and Cambridge, UK.   Founded by Dr. Abdalaziz Sager less than two decades ago, with the overriding strategic maxim of “Knowledge for All,” the GRC has rapidly become a leading institute specializing in research, education, seminars, workshops, publications, and consultancy.

Continue reading »

The Future Significance of the Gulf Cooperation Council

By John Duke Anthony

DOWNLOAD “The Future Significance of the Gulf Cooperation Council” (.pdf)

The world today faces numerous challenges, including ongoing fallout from the international financial crises and instances of interstate conflict. Combined with the many changes affecting the regional and global balances of power these challenges raise questions about how power will be distributed in the coming two decades.

With this in mind, the Emirates Center for Strategic Studies and Research (ECSSR) held its 16th Annual Conference on “Global Strategic Developments: A Futuristic Vision” in Abu Dhabi in March 2011, and recently published the conference’s papers. Available from the ECSSR through the link provided below, the volume provides a professional and academic investigation of the global challenges that lie ahead.

Continue reading »

The Gulf Cooperation Council at 31: Implications of Trends and Indications for GCC and US Interests

U.S.-GCC Corporate Cooperation CommitteeOn May 24, 2012, the National Council on U.S.-Arab Relations and the U.S.-GCC Corporate Cooperation Committee hosted “The Gulf Cooperation Council at 31: Implications of Trends and Indications for GCC and US Interests” at the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center in Washington, DC. Participating specialists were: Dr. Odeh Aburdene, Ms. Randa Fahmy Hudome, Mr. Andrew Rabens, Mr. Robert Sharp, Ms. Molly Williamson, and Mr. Joshua Yaphe. National Council Founding President and CEO Dr. John Duke Anthony served as moderator. A podcast, video, and transcription of the program is available below.

Strategic Dynamics of Iran-GCC Relations

By John Duke Anthony

DOWNLOAD “Strategic Dynamics of Iran-GCC relations” (.pdf)

Industrialization in the Gulf: A socioeconomic revolution, from the Georgetown University Center for Contemporary Arab Studies, examines the rapid industrialization of the GCC region and how local economies are beginning to diversify away from petroleum. The volume explores the causes, dimensions, and consequences of industrialization as well as the impact of this transformative process on the region’s economy and social composition.

National Council President & CEO Dr. John Duke Anthony contributed an essay to the volume on “Strategic Dynamics of Iran-GCC Relations.” Access to the essay can be made through the links above and below.

Continue reading »

20 Years Ago Today

TODAY marks the anniversary of a momentous event: the reversal of Iraq’s aggression against Kuwait from August 2, 1990 to February 28, 1991. For Kuwaitis, the citizenry of their fellow GCC members, and people from many other countries, including the United States and other Allied Coalition members, the multifaceted damage inflicted by Iraq in the course of its invasion and occupation of Kuwait unleashed changes from which the world has yet to fully recover.

KuwaitThe most comprehensive and rigorously applied international and political sanctions against any country in the last century, and the impact of the sanctions’ applicability and enforcement, remain a source of ongoing controversy in terms of their differing impact on Iraqis and Kuwaitis. Even now, two decades later, important postwar facets of what Iraq did to Kuwait remain elusive of closure. Certainly, the international legal dictum of an aggressor providing prompt, adequate, and effective compensation for the war’s victims has yet to be honored.

MIAs and Context

A full accounting of the fate of all of the Kuwaiti and other countries’ missing citizens — swept up and carted off to Iraq in the war’s waning hours — remains incomplete. At a recent gathering of diplomats, scholars, media representatives, and individuals who fought to liberate Kuwait and American armed forces’ civil affairs personnel who participated in the country’s reconstruction at George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs, it was noted that more than 500 of the missing Kuwaitis have died since their capture, but the fate of more than 200 of those missing remains unknown.

The more than 700 Kuwaitis who were and remain missing may seem small to some. However, they are more than 700 too many if viewed from the perspective of the victims and their loved ones who continue to await and pray for their return.

Continue reading »